fbpx

Category: The Independent

Bahrain Grand Prix: Five things we learned as Lewis Hamilton claimed opening victory over Max Verstappen

Lewis Hamilton opened his bid for an unprecedented eighth world championship by beating Max Verstappen to victory in Bahrain.
Formula One’s two brightest stars diced for the win in an opening race which will live long in the memory.
Here, the PA news agency looks back at five things we learned from Sunday’s F1 curtain raiser.
Hamilton’s “still got it”
Hamilton had no right to win Sunday’s first race of the campaign. On tyres 11-laps older than Verstappen’s and in a slower machine, many would have wilted under the pressure.

Read original

Bahrain Grand Prix live stream: How to watch F1 online and on TV today

Red Bull will look to take the championship fight to Lewis Hamilton and Mercedes after Max Verstappengrabbed pole in a thrilling qualification for the Bahrain Grand Prix.
There are plenty of narratives to keep an eye on during the opening race, including whether Ferrari can bounce back after a horrible 2020 season.
While Fernando Alonso produced an impressive display in qualification to reach Q3.
But all the talk is at the top of the grid in what promises to set the tone for the rest of the season.

Read original

Is Bahrain Grand Prix on TV? What channel is F1 on and when does it start?

There are plenty of narratives to follow as the 2021 Formula 1 season kicks off at the Bahrain Grand Prix.
Mercedes’ Lewis Hamilton knows he’s in for a battle to claim his eighth world title, with Red Bull’s Max Verstappen seizing pole in qualification and setting an early marker in the title race.
McLaren’s line-up of Daniel Ricciardo and Lando Norris is also exciting and the car has shown plenty of promise.
It will also be interesting to assess the chances of Aston Martin, Alpine and Ferrari ahead of what looks set to be an exciting midfield battle too.

Read original

Lewis Hamilton returns amid cloud of uncertainty as Max Verstappen bids to end Mercedes dynasty

Lewis Hamilton is back but the seven-time world champion returns with a cloud of uncertainty as he bids to grab an eighth crown to surpass Michael Schumacher as the sport’s most decorated driver.
The Briton will start Sunday’s Bahrain Grand Prix in the knowledge that he may be about to experience his last in the sport.
The Mercedes maestro was at the centre of speculation throughout an gripping off-season, eventually ending it to pen a one-year extension with the team to try claim a fifth successive title and a seventh in eight seasons.

Read original

Damon Hill tips Max Verstappen to dethrone Lewis Hamilton and land world title

Hamilton landed his seventh crown last term in a procession, but after concerning signs during testing and optimism at Red Bull, there is hope that a closer title race could unfold.

And Hill, a champion himself in 1996, believes the Dutch maestro is primed to edge out his Mercedes rival.

“I have got a sneaking feeling that Max could nick this, that is how my gut is going at the moment,” said the Briton.

“But when we get off this call my senses will return and I will immediately realise that I have underestimated, yet again, the power of the Hamilton-Mercedes train.

Read original

Lewis Hamilton ‘being used’ by Black Lives Matter, claims Bernie Ecclestone

Bernie Ecclestone claims Lewis Hamilton is “being used” by Black Lives Matter movement and insists he would have banned the gesture of taking a knee before races if he was still in charge of Formula 1.

The seven-time world champion has led the sport’s push to deliver messages on social issues, with drivers on the grid kneeling before races last season in support for the fight against racism, but Ecclestone maintains that gesture would not have happened if he was in charge.

Read original

Saudi Arabia Grand Prix to be F1’s fastest street race

Saudi Arabia’s debut Formula One grand prix in December will feature the fastest street circuit in the sport.

At 6.175km, the Jeddah Street Circuit will be the second longest on the calendar and enable average speeds of around 250km/h.

Formula One managing director Ross Brawn said: “The design brings out the best of a modern street circuit but also has fast paced free flowing areas that will create fast speeds and overtaking opportunities.

“The setting is incredible, on the Red Sea, and we can’t wait to see the cars on the track in December.

Read original

Murray Walker: Formula 1 commentator loved for his infectious enthusiasm

Murray Walker began his broadcast career at a hill climb in Worcester in 1948, providing the commentary over the public address system on behalf of the Midlands Automobile Club. Young Murray got the nod after a word from his father, a motorcycle rider of some pedigree and at the time the early voice of motorsport at the BBC.   

In his autobiography, published in 2002, Walker acknowledged the nepotism involved but did not let that get in his way, promising a “non-stop barrage of facts, figures, hysteria and opinion”.

Read original

Murray Walker: Formula One broadcasting legend dies, aged 97

One of the sport’s most popular figures, Walker was awarded an OBE in 1996 for services to broadcasting and motor racing.

His career spanned more than 50 years – his first grand prix for the BBC coming at Silverstone in 1949 – with the commentator retiring in 2001.

He would eventually assume the position of Formula One commentator permanently in 1978 with the sport’s popularity growing significantly.

A statement from Formula 1 said: “We are immensely sad to hear that Murray Walker has passed away. His passion and love of the sport inspired millions of fans around the world.

Read original

Murray Walker: Formula 1 commentator whose infectious enthusiasm endeared himself to a nation

Murray Walker began his broadcast career at a hill climb in Worcester in 1948, providing the commentary over the public address system on behalf of the Midlands Automobile Club. Young Murray got the nod after a word from his father, a motor cycle rider of some pedigree and at the time the early voice of motorsport at the BBC.   

In his autobiography, published in 2002, Walker acknowledged the nepotism involved but did not let that get in his way, promising a “non-stop barrage of facts, figures, hysteria and opinion”.

Read original

Loading